Admin or admiration?

4 days into our 27 day world record ride and it's no coincidence that all the roads here incorporate the word 'Hill'

Happy Friday-ish!

And welcome to edition 283 (isn’t that a lot!). For those of you who are new around these parts, my name is David Charles and I’m a UK-based writer, bike botherer and outdoor instructor.

Greetings from Black Dog, Devon

Apologies for the late running of this service: yesterday I was too busy cycling to write and today I have been too busy recovering.

We are now 4 days into our 27 day bike-powered GPS drawing of Refugees Welcome and it's no coincidence that all the roads around here incorporate the word 'Hill'.

Copstone Hill, Cuckoo Hill, Polson Hill, Beech Hill Cross, North Hill Lane. (There's also a Cockrattle Lane, but that's a different story.)

Since our departure from St Austell on Tuesday, we've climbed over 6400m: coast to coast to coast through Cornwall, followed by a loop-the-loop of Dartmoor.

For those of you catching up, Thighs of Steel (of which I am a mere cog) are attempting to create the world's largest bike-powered GPS art by riding a serpentine route around the south of England that spells out the words 'Refugees Welcome'.

If we are successful, it will break the current world record by a completely unnecessary 1500km.

FOLLOW THE RIDE

But, as they say, it's all for a good cause. We are fundraising for Choose Love, a charity that re-distributes donations to dozens of grassroots refugee projects in the UK and abroad.

These projects have been hit hard by the pandemic and would be completely unable to offer any services at all without the generosity of hundreds of individuals making small cash donations.

What's great about Choose Love is that they can send the money wherever it is needed NOW.

As you may have gathered from the news, forced migration happens suddenly and it's often the small grassroots projects that are best able to respond fast enough to help people when they need it most.

Thank you for all your donations - they are powering both our thighs and (more importantly) the work of these refugee support projects.

DONATE

These first four days (we hope) will be the toughest of the whole tour, certainly in terms of distance and elevation, and I would be lying if I said that, at times, I have not reflected unfavourably upon my life choices.

Such as on Wednesday, when we cranked our way up two irrelevant hills to form the inlet of the 'R', only to return over the same exact same hills to finish off the tail.

And these are not hills in the sense that you might imagine if you live in the Home Counties, East Anglia, or even Scotland. These are Devonshire and Cornish hills. Road builders here seem to delight in driving you perpendicular to the contour lines. Not a zig-zag in sight, just a sheer wall of asphalt.

But the consolation in those absurd moments of repeated routing is not what we are doing, but why.

At the end of our hill reps on Wednesday, in the very butt of the R, a man called Ray Christmas signed our logbook. Ray Christmas!

Wait - the logbook? Ah, yes, the logbook! Every World Record Attempter's nightmare - literally.

I swear, two nights ago, I dreamt that Philip Schofield agreed to sign our logbook in exchange for sexual favours.

Schofield, aside, the logbook is the evidence Guinness need to verify our record. Every time we stop, we have to write that information into the logbook: date, time, distance travelled, location - and get that information signed off by an independent witness.

It's a lot of admin. Stop the GPS, check the time, check the distance, enter the time, enter the distance, add up today's distance to yesterday's total distance, eat half a flapjack, cast around for a human being who looks like not-a-dick.

Then we launch into The Spiel - 'Sorrytobotheryoudoyoumindmeaskingafavourwearetryingtobreakaworldrecord' - all the while gauging their eyes and frown lines for signs of curiosity and generosity or suspicion and derision.

No, this logbook is more than admin - it's a total ballache.

But, I confess, these witness signing ceremonies are often the highlight of our day.

The vicar of Holy Trinity, St Austell, who prayed for our steely thighs.

Luke and David at Bodmin steam railway, who donated Β£5 and a Thomas the Tank Engine flag.

The family in the wind and rain who donated halloumi fresh from their barbecue.

The woman wearing the Choose Love t-shirt in Boscastle - how could we not stop her?

The inestimable Janet Downes who carted us from R to E and donated homemade cheesy flapjacks.

Margitta and Nick and Lee and Laura and Pippa and Rolf and Bri and Penny who have hosted and roasted us in their warm homes.

Ian the accordian player from Of Stone And Earth in Chagford.

Debbie and Rob from the village shop in South Brent, who insisted on doing a Facebook Live with us and donated Β£10 and a bag of dark chocolate gooseberries.

The volunteers at Spreyton community shop who donated two pieces of Bakewell Tart.

Gordon Ramsey.

Wait, what? Yes - TV celeb chef Gordon Ramsey. Spotted by Naomi out on a bike trail, enjoying a quiet cup of tea. At least he was enjoying a quiet cup of tea until Naomi fell off her bike in shock and I went up to him shouting 'Are you Gordon Ramsey?'

To be fair, he took it pretty well - better than I would have done if someone had come up to me and shouted 'Are you Gordon Ramsey?'

He signed our logbook, wished us well and gave me a fistbump. What more can you ask?

So, the logbook: yes, it's a chore, but it's also given us the moments that make this bike ride like no other bike ride.

This experience has made me want to make a logbook, a sort of a guestbook, for all my future rides too. How wonderful to make these connections as we pass through these villages and towns, how lucky.

I suppose it's all about how you look at the world, isn't it? My feelings about this baleful world record lurch, moment to moment, from admin to admiration.

Open minds, open hearts, open logbook.


100 Days of Adventure

🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒

🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒🟒βšͺβšͺ

βšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺ

βšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺβšͺ

What is this?


See you out there, on the road. If not in reals, then right here next week.

Big love,

dc: